Phrasal Verbs

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Phrasal Verbs and other multi-word verbs Phrasal verbs are part of a large group of verbs called multi-word verbs . Phrasal verbs and other multi-word verbs are an important part of the English language. Multi-word verbs, including phrasal verbs, are very common, especially in spoken English. A multi-word verb is a verb like pick up , turn on or get on with . For convenience, many people refer to all multi-word verbs as phrasal verbs. These verbs consist of a basic verb + another word or wo
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  Phrasal Verbs and other multi-word verbs Phrasal verbs are part of a large group of verbs called multi-word verbs . Phrasalverbs and other multi-word verbs are an important part of the English language.Multi-word verbs, including phrasal verbs, are very common, especially in spokenEnglish. A multi-word verb is a verb like pick up , turn on or get on with . Forconvenience, many people refer to all multi-word verbs as phrasal verbs. Theseverbs consist of a basic verb + another word or words . The other word(s) can beprepositions and/or adverbs. The two or three words that make up multi-wordverbs form a short phrase - which is why these verbs are often all called phrasalverbs .The important thing to remember is that a multi-word verb is still a verb. Get is averb. Get up , is also a verb, a different verb. Get and get up are two differentverbs. They do not have the same meaning. So you should treat each multi-wordverb as a separate verb, and learn it like any other verb. Look at these examples.You can see that there are three types of multi-word verb:single-word verb look direct your eyesin a certaindirectionYou must look beforeyou leap.multi-wordverbsprepositionalverbs lookafter take care ofWho is lookingafter the baby?phrasal verbs look up search for andfind informationin a referencebookYou can look up mynumber in the telephonedirectory.phrasal-prepositionalverbs lookforwardto anticipate withpleasureI look forwardto meeting you. Phrasal Verbs Phrasal verbs are a group of multi-word verbs made from a verb plus another wordor words. Many people refer to all multi-word verbs as phrasal verbs. On thesepages we make a distinction between three types of multi-word verbs: prepositionalverbs, phrasal verbs and phrasal-prepositional verbs.Phrasal verbs are made of:verb + adverbPhrasal verbs can be: ã intransitive (no direct object) ã transitive (direct object)  Here are some examples of phrasal verbs: phrasalverbsmeaningexamples   directobject intransitivephrasalverbs get up rise from bedI don't like to get up . breakdown cease tofunctionHe was late because hiscar broke down . transitivephrasalverbs put off  postponeWe will have to put off  themeeting. turn down refuseThey turned down my offer. Separable Phrasal Verbs When phrasal verbs are transitive (that is, they have a direct object), we canusually separate the two parts. For example, turn down is a separable phrasalverb. We can say: turn down my offer or turn my offer down . Look at thistable:transitive phrasal verbs are separable They turned   down my offer.They turned my offer down .However, if the direct object is a pronoun , we have no choice. We must separatethe phrasal verb and insert the pronoun between the two parts. Look at thisexample with the separable phrasal verb switch on :direct objectpronouns must gobetween the twoparts of transitive phrasalverbsJohn switched   on theradio.These are allpossible.John switched theradio on .John switched it on .  John switchedon it.Thisis not possible.Separable or inseparable phrasal verbs? Some dictionaries tell you when phrasalverbs are separable. If a dictionary writes look (something) up , you know that thephrasal verb look up is separable, and you can say look something up and lookup something . It's a good idea to write something/somebody as appropriate inyour vocabulary book when you learn a new phrasal verb, like this: ã get up ã break down ã put something/somebody off  ã turn sthg/sby down This tells you whether the verb needs a direct object (and where to put it). Prepositional Verbs Prepositional verbs are a group of multi-word verbs made from a verb plus anotherword or words. Many people refer to all multi-word verbs as phrasal verbs. Onthese pages we make a distinction between three types of multi-word verbs:prepositional verbs, phrasal verbs and phrasal-prepositional verbs. On this page welook at prepositional verbs .Prepositional verbs are made of:verb + prepositionBecause a preposition always has an object, all prepositional verbs have directobjects. Here are some examples of prepositional verbs: prepositionalverbsmeaningexamples   directobjectbelieve in have faith in theexistence of I believe in God. look after take care ofHe is lookingafter the dog. talk about discussDid you talkabout me? wait for awaitJohn is waitingfor Mary.  Prepositional verbs cannot be separated. That means that we cannot put the directobject between the two parts. For example, we must say look after the baby . Wecannot say look the baby after :prepositional verbs are inseparable Who is looking after thebaby?This is possible.Who is looking the baby after ?This is not possible. Phrasal-prepositional Verbs Phrasal-prepositional verbs are a small group of multi-word verbs made from a verbplus another word or words. Many people refer to all multi-word verbs as phrasalverbs. On these pages we make a distinction between three types of multi-wordverbs: prepositional verbs, phrasal verbs and phrasal-prepositional verbs. On thispage we look at phrasal-prepositional verbs .Phrasal-prepositional verbs are made of:verb + adverb + prepositionLook at these examples of phrasal-prepositional verbs: phrasal-prepositionalverbsmeaningexamples   directobjectget on with have a friendlyrelationship withHe doesn't get onwith his wife. put up with tolerateI won't put upwith yourattitude. look forward to anticipate withpleasureI look forward to seeing you. run out of  use up, exhaustWe have run outof  eggs.Because phrasal-prepositional verbs end with a preposition, there is always a directobject. And, like prepositional verbs, phrasal-prepositional verbs cannot beseparated. Look at these examples:phrasal-prepositional verbs are inseparable We ran out of  fuel.We ran out of  it.
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