commitment to social justice reflection1

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Running head: COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL JUSTICE 1 Commitment to Social Justice Fernando Arce Loyola university Chicago COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL JUSTICE 2 During my first semester in the higher education program at Loyola University Chicago, I felt prepared to have discussions surrounding social justice because of my work
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  Running head: COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL JUSTICE 1 Commitment to Social Justice   Fernando Arce   Loyola university Chicago    COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL JUSTICE 2 During my first semester in the higher education program at Loyola University Chicago, I felt prepared to have discussions surrounding social justice because of my work at Roosevelt University. During my undergraduate education, my courses had components of social justice sprinkled throughout and Roosevelt’s history was based on social justice pra ctices that I felt more than capable to explore this theme in a more structured class. I still remember that first class meeting, I was in the front row waiting on our professor to come in, making small talk with folks I had met at the HESA orientation, I was anxious to begin my graduate course work but also excited. As soon as Dr. Bridget Turner-Kelly came in, I could just feel that this class was going to challenge me in the best way possible. One of the first things that we did as a class was to set expectations for one another to keep ourselves accountable and on track for the remainder of the semester. The one of those expectations that resonates with me still is the concept of challenging with care. I thought I knew everything that I needed to know about social justice and Bridget was quick to make me realize I still had a long way. For this artifact, I decided to use the second part of our photo elicitation project where we compare our understanding of: privilege, oppression, and social justice. A photo elicitation is a  project fusing concepts of visual and reflection to develop the understanding on a concept, theme, or idea. For this project, we were tasked to go through our daily life and take pictures of what we assisted to each of these terms throughout the semester. At the beginning of the project, I took pictures that to me were obvious and very surface level, explaining that I did not see much oppression or questions of social justice in my neighborhood. I would feel uneasy that while those two terms were difficult for me to visualize in my daily life, I never felt it difficult to highlight the privilege I saw or experienced around my apartment or neighborhood.  COMMITMENT TO SOCIAL JUSTICE 3 Finally, when we revisited the first photo elicitation project and we compared how we increased our understanding of the concepts, I saw the development I had made from the  beginning of the semester to how I understood the concepts Bridget had us deconstruct. I saw these terms in more depth, thinking more how my privilege was more than just monetary value of my possessions or geographical location of my apartment. I saw that social justice was more than just discussing how we can change the playing field for folks that do not have a head start in society. I was able to articulate how I was oppressed by my Hispanic identity in a society that favors my White counterparts. This project helped me track the changes in my development but also serves to illustrate how effective this course was as an introduction for students that once they leave the program, will be working with a diverse array of students.
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